Steve Heston Directory Page

Steve Heston

Steve Heston

Professor

Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University

  • Finance

  • Steve Heston graduated with a BS double major in Mathematics and Economics from the University of Maryland, College Park in 1983. He attended the Graduate School of Industrial Administration and earned an MBA in 1985 followed by a PhD in Finance in 1990. He has held previous faculty positions at Yale, Columbia, Washington University, and the University of Auckland in New Zealand. He has worked in the private sector with Goldman Sachs in Fixed Income Arbitrage and in Asset Management Quantitative Equities. He is known for analyzing options with stochastic volatility and international stock risk.

    Employment

    University of Maryland, College Park, 2002-Present
    Professor of Finance

    Goldman Sachs (New York), 1998-2002
    Vice President (U.S. Arbitrage)
    Vice President (Quantitative Equities)

    Washington University in St. Louis, 1994-1998
    Assistant Professor of Finance

    Columbia Business School, 1993-1994
    Visiting Assistant Professor of Finance

    Yale School of Organization and Management, 1989-1993
    Assistant Professor of Finance

    Education

    Carnegie Mellon University, Graduate School of Industrial Administration

    Ph.D. in Finance, 1990
    M.S. in Finance, 1987
    M.S. in Industrial Administration ("M.B.A."), 1985

    University of Maryland, College Park

    B.S. in Mathematics and Economics, 1983

    • w/ Blair Rodman and Lee Nelson, Kill Phil, Huntington Press, 2005.

    Provide approximate optimal strategies for no-limit hold'em poker tournaments.

    • w/ Blair Rodman and Lee Nelson, Kill Elky, Huntington Press, 2009.

    For French readers.

    • w/ Lee Nelson and Tysen Streib, Kill Everyone, Huntington Press, 2007.

    Use game theory to derive equilibrium poker tournament strategies.

    Scholarly (Refereed) Articles

    1. "A Closed-Form Solution for Options with Stochastic Volatility, with Applications to Bond and Currency Options," Review of Financial Studies 6, No. 2 (1993) 327-343 (Reprinted in Stochastic Volatility (Neil Shephard ed.), Oxford University Press, 2005).
    2. "Invisible Parameters in Option Prices," Journal of Finance 48, No. 3 (1993) 933-947
    3. Heston, Steven L. and K. Geert Rouwenhorst, "Does Industrial Structure Explain the Benefits of International Diversification," Journal of Financial Economics 36 (1994) 3-27 (featured in December 17th 1994 Economist magazine).
    4. Heston, Steven L., K. Geert Rouwenhorst, and Roberto Wessels, "The Structure of International Stock Returns and the Integration of Capital Markets," Journal of Empirical Finance 2, (1995) 173-197. 
    5. Heston, Steven L. and K. Geert Rouwenhorst, “Industry and Country Effects in International Stock Returns,” Journal of Portfolio Management 21, No. 3 (1995) 53-58.
    6. Heston, Steven L. and K. Geert Rouwenhorst, “The Role of Beta and Size in the Cross-Section of European Stock Returns,” European Financial Management 5, No. 1 (1999) 9-28.
    7. "Valuation and Hedging of Risky Lease Payments," Financial Analysts Journal 55, No. 1 (1999) 88-94.
    8. Heston, Steven L. and Guofu Zhou, “On the Rate of Convergence of Discrete-Time Contingent Claims,” Mathematical Finance 10, No. 1 (2000) 53-75.
    9. Heston, Steven L. and Saikat Nandi, “A Closed Form GARCH Option Valuation Model,” Review of Financial Studies 13, No. 3 (2000) 585-625.
    10. "Option Pricing with Infinitely Divisible Distributions,” Quantitative Finance 4 (October 2004), 515-524. This paper uses path-dependence to recover risk-neutral probabilities from true probabilities, in the spirit of the Ross Recovery Theorem.
    11. Christoffersen, Peter, Steven L. Heston, and Kris Jacobs, “Option Valuation with Conditional Skewness,” Journal of Econometrics, 131, No. 2 (2006), 253-285. 
    12. Heston, Steven L, Mark Loewenstein, and Greg Willard, “Options and Bubbles,” Review of Financial Studies, 20, No. 2 (2007), 359-390.
    13. A Model of Discontinuous Interest Rate Behavior, Yield Curves and Volatility,” Review of Derivatives Research 10, no. 3 (2007), 205-225.
    14. Heston, Steven L. and Ronnie Sadka, “Seasonality in the Cross-Section of Stock Returns,” Journal of Financial Economics, 85, (2008), 418-445.
    15. Camara, Antonio and Steven L. Heston, “Closed Form Option Pricing Formulas with Extreme Events,” Journal of Futures Markets, 28, No. 3 (2008), 213-230.
    16. Heston, Steven L. and Dan Bernhardt, “Point Shaving in College Basketball:  A Cautionary Tale for Forensic Economics,” Economic Inquiry, (2009).
    17. Heston, Steven L., Peter Christoffersen and Kris Jacobs, “The Shape and Term Structure of the Volatility Smirk,” Management Science 55, No. 12 (December 2009), 1914-1932.
    18. Common Patterns of Predictability in the Cross-Section of International Stock Returns,” Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis. 
    19. Heston, Steven L., Robert Korajczyk, and Ronnie Sadka, “Intraday Patterns in the Cross-Section of Stock Returns,” Journal of Finance 65, No. 4 (August 2010), 1369-1407. 

    Other Articles:

    1. "Discrete-Time Versions of Continuous-Time Interest Rate Models," Journal of Fixed-Income 5 (1995) 86-88.
    2. “A Two-Factor Term Structure Model under GARCH Volatility” (with Saikat Nandi), Journal of Fixed Income 13, No. 1 (2003) 87-95.

    Working Papers:

    1. Christoffersen, Peter, Steven Heston, and Krisk Jacobs “Option Anomalies and the Pricing Kernel
    2. Heston, Steven L., Robert Korajczyk, Ronnie Sadka and Lewis Thorson “Are You Trading Predictably?

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