Library of Congress Exhibits

Rosa Parks: In Her Own Words

Thomas Jefferson Building - South Gallery
10 1st Street SE, Washington, DC 20540

Dates: Ongoing from February to May 2022
Time: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

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"Rosa Parks: In Her Own Words" showcases rarely seen materials that offer an intimate view of Rosa Parks and documents her life and activism—creating a rich opportunity for viewers to discover new dimensions to their understanding of this seminal figure. The materials are drawn extensively from the Rosa Parks Collection, a gift to the Library of Congress from the Howard G. Buffett Foundation.

IMPORTANT NOTE: In order to enter the Library's Thomas Jefferson Building and experience the exhibition, each visit must apply for and receive one of a limited number of free timed entry passes. For information on reserving tickets, visit loc.gov/visit, where visitors can review “Know Before You Go” guidelines and reserve their free passes. Each visitor must have a printed paper pass or a digital copy of the pass available on a mobile device for entry. All visitors, regardless of age, must have a timed pass for entry, and each visitor will be able to reserve up to (6) passes. Passes will be released on a rolling, 30-day basis, so for visitors planning to visit within the next month, please visit the reservation site for availability.

Black History Is Black Health

Thomas Jefferson Building - Northwest Curtain, Second Floor
10 1st Street SE, Washington, DC 20540

Dates: Ongoing from February to May 2022
Time: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

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This special display focuses on "Health and Wellness" for the theme of Black History Month. W.E.B (William Edward Burghardt) Du Bois and Booker T. Washington were well-known leaders of the Black community in the late ninetieth and twentieth centuries. Even though they disagreed over strategies for social and economic progress for Blacks, they each addressed health as an issue. Washington is the founder of National Negro Health Week, and Du Bois figured in the call to arms for the improvement of Negro poverty and its associated ill-health. Featured items for this display are from the Library’s General Collections and the Prints and Photographs Division.

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